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Found 25 results

  1. There was an addition like this on geomagnetic storms into the database. Can we have a poll on whether we add more sunspot regions/active regions and solar flares into the database? (Note: This is not an official poll, it is a suggestion by faster328) Poll votes are private.
  2. There are magnetically complex regions that produce lots of solar flares like 5395 (β-γ-δ), 9393 (β-γ-δ), and 13664 (β-γ-δ). In SC22, there exist only three very flare-productive active regions, 5395 (β-γ-δ), 5629 (β-γ-δ), and 6659 (β-γ-δ), that produced X21.5, X28.5 and X12+ flares, respectively. In SC23, there exist only two very flare-productive active regions, 9393 (β-γ-δ), and 10486 (β-γ-δ), that produced X28.5 and X45 flares, respectively. In SC24, there exist only one very flare-productive active region, 12192 (β-γ-δ), that produced an X4.5 flare. In SC25, there currently exist only one very flare-productive active region, 13664 (β-γ-δ), that produced an X8.7 flare. (plus X12 on the farside) Typical regions like 13659 (α) last for a short time but bigger regions like 13655 (β), 13648 (β-γ), and 13663 (β-γ-δ) last longer, but the biggest regions, like 13664 (β-γ-δ), tend to last the longest. Here are some images for three flare-productive active regions from 1989 to 2024. https://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/mitaka_solar/wl-fulldisk-photo/calendar/1989/jpg/wl19890311_001.jpg - 5395 (β-γ-δ) https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/images/Archief/2003/Sunspots/sunspots_20031028.jpg - 10486 (β-γ-δ) https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/images/Archief/2024/Sun/20240511_HMIIF.jpg - 13664 (β-γ-δ) So, how many flare-productive active regions are there per solar cycle?
  3. This is old AR 5395 when it reached its peak size of 3600 MSH on March 17, 1989 (note that AR 5395 is the big region on the northwestern limb/top right), that is famous for the March 1989 geomagnetic storm: https://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/mitaka_solar/wl-fulldisk-photo/calendar/1989/jpg/wl19890317_001.jpg Please discuss anything about old AR 5395 and the March 1989 geomagnetic storm here.
  4. Did anyone know that peak flux levels above X15 are estimated? Plus there is dispute about what is the largest solar flare ever recorded since 1976? Is it the 2003/11/04 flare (X45), the 1991/06/01 flare (X17+), or the 1989/08/16 flare (X28.5+)? Image of 1989/08/14 (5629 (β-γ-δ) is the big region at the southwestern limb/bottom right, 5643 (β-γ-δ) is the big region at the northeastern limb/top left), 2 big regions. Image source: https://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/mitaka_solar/wl-fulldisk-photo/calendar/1989/jpg/wl19890814_001.jpg Discuss anything about large solar flares here.
  5. From the album: Sun refractor 185 mm Halpha

    A magnificent solar flare this May 13, 2024 with my 185mm apo Askar scope with Fabry Perot PST Coronado optimized Halpha Barlow 2.5 x and Camera player one

    © andre cassese

  6. From the album: Sun refractor 185 mm Halpha

    The large active ejection zone May 9, 2024 AR 3664 185 mm APO refractor in double stack Febry Perot PST Coronado modified and optimized Camera player one and barlow 2.5x
  7. This si a weird topic, but the movie "Knowing" is what got me interested in learning about space weather. If y'all have watched the movie, you know it ends with the Earth being destroyed by a Superflare. Now, I've heard some people say the Sun CAN produce a similar superflare, but some also say it's not possible for our Sun to do that either. Does anyone know if a Superflare like the one in "Knowing" is possible from our Sun... or what would be needed for that to happen?
  8. From the album: refractor 150 mm halpha observatoire Rocbaron

    Solar Flare May 10, 2023. Photos made with my 150 mm Halpha refractor telescope equipped with his stallion Fabry Perot PST Coronado prototype of 2004, optimized and modified by me, a Barlow 2x for enlargement and my Apollo IMX 429 camera.

    © Andre cassese

  9. From the album: refractor 150 mm halpha observatoire Rocbaron

    The magnificent ejections of this May 10, 2023. Photos made with my 150 mm Halpha refractor telescope with his stallion Fabry Perot PST Coronado prototype of 2004, optimized and modified by me, a Barlow 2x for enlargement and my Apollo IMX 429 camera.

    © Andre cassese

  10. From the album: refractor 150 mm halpha observatoire Rocbaron

    This January 18, 2023 magnificent big spot with a double ejection that we see rising like a huge lasso, the luminous point in the spot and one of the ejection zones. 150 mm Halpha refractor in Coronado PST standard double stack and Apollo imx 429 camera

    © Andre cassese

  11. From the album: refractor 150 mm halpha observatoire Rocbaron

    solar ejections and sunspots very active areas November 11, 2022. Refractor 150 mm apo halpha with modified and optimized double fabry Perrot PST standards (DMK 41 camera and 2x barlow)

    © Andre cassese

  12. From the album: refractor 150 mm halpha observatoire Rocbaron

    Magnificent filaments forming gigantic loops on the solar surface and active areas or plasma geysers form fountains The modification in double PST opened to me an Unsuspected dimension of our star, everything is nothing more than relief with peaks, waves, mountains and plains, everything is movement and vertigo, because the contemplation of this plasma in fury and a fascinating monstrosity

    © Andre cassese

  13. Hello, I have been passively following the forum for almost a year. Want to dirty my hands and learn a few things. The dashboard is fantastic to see the past flares and the latest CMEs (cactus). What I have been trying to figure out is (a) how to link which flares listed under Solar flares correspond to the CMEs under Latest CMEs. If I would like to see which of the M flares yday produced CMEs, how to do that? (b) what should I be looking at/ be looking for to know if the CME is earth directed in the CACTUS images? If there are resources that shed details on this, pls do point me in that direction. Thanks for the help!
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