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Region 3053


MinYoongi

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Well, Min, I was looking at “whole” disk images, visually, so I wasn’t counting the little spots. To me, visually, using white light and continuum filters, The big spots on 3053 and 3055 in particular, seemed to have more contrast, appeared darker, and really just jumped right out at me. I bit subjective, I know, its not like looking at processed satellite images, numbers on paper or published sunspot counts, etc… 

It still looks pretty good to me on the Intensitygram, although I haven’t compared it to 10 & 20 hours ago… 

Time to get set up outside!

Cheers.

W & A

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On 7/5/2022 at 5:22 AM, MinYoongi said:

Thanks alot 🙂 ! 
Theres one part that i dont fully get though : 
"due to projection effect as the polarity of sunspots seem to change near the limbs."
Do they really CHANGE or do they appear different on SDO Imagery so we cant accurately determine their polarity? Or is it a sun mechanism that they switch polaritys at the limbs?

Hi Min,

Ever been to the desert? Often, in the distance, you see a “mirage”, looks like water in the distance, same kind of thing. The other thing is that (check out the diagram in FAQ) light traveling to the earth from the limbs has too pass through more of the sun’s “atmosphere”, this causes some wavelengths of light to scatter more than others. So, it appears a little dimmer and redder. (And a little more blurred). 

Think about the sunset (from here on earth). You can stand on the beach and watch the sun set into the ocean, with your naked eye. That’s because the light coming from the sun must travel through more of the earth’s atmosphere than when it is overhead. More atmosphere means more scattering of light. Also, as different wavelengths are scattered differently, it looks more “reddish “. Thus, it is less bright and lovers can hold hands on the beach for 90 seconds and watch it slide below the waves without even sunglasses on! 😎

Same kinda thing with light coming here from the limbs, they pass through more of the sun’s atmosphere, even when it’s overhead for us (but don’t look without filters because the light from the near side travels through the minimum amount of earth’s atmosphere.

Also, keep in mind that the regions of the sun we call “the limbs” are not “special” to the sun. Only to us, because of the angle of view and the amount of atmosphere the light must pass through. The “limbs” themselves are the edges of a rotating object. There is nothing special about the limbs that would affect magnetic polarity or really anything else. If you were watching the sun from Mars, the “limbs” of the sun would be at different locations on the face of the sun as compared to what we see from earth.

I hope that makes sense. And helps…

I know, clear as  Mississippi Mud!

L & A

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Just now, Jesterface23 said:

It was hard to tell STEREO A's view of the /08 CME in coronagraph imagery, but it looks like it arrived at the satellite a few hours ago with an IMF strength around 30nT.

will it hit earth?

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8 minutes ago, Orneno said:

Because STEREO A is closer to the sun, or what?

The difference in distance is small enough that it wouldn't make much of a change. There are factors like being impacted by different areas of the CME with the strength dissipating further from the center or what the solar wind parameters are prior to the arrival.

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2 hours ago, Jesterface23 said:

The difference in distance is small enough that it wouldn't make much of a change. There are factors like being impacted by different areas of the CME with the strength dissipating further from the center or what the solar wind parameters are prior to the arrival.

Ahhh, the impact was more frontal (or at least an impact) there than the glancing/nothing we are expected to get? Makes sense. 30nT is pretty good, it did look like a decent CME

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10 minutes ago, Orneno said:

Ahhh, the impact was more frontal (or at least an impact) there than the glancing/nothing we are expected to get?

Yeah, it is similar to the CME several weeks back. STEREO A was somewhere on the edge of a direct hit and we ended up being hit by the tip of the edge, or outside of the edge of the bulk of the CME

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On 7/9/2022 at 1:04 PM, WildWill said:

Then you start looking at ergs or any other units you wish, usually with a very large exponent. But that doesn’t really hold much meaning unless you think about your everyday “stuff” in ergs or whatever units you want.

If you are used to thinking of the Sun in terms of size, many things will seem small. Humans tend to have their brain fuses blown with size/distance. However, if you think of scale/distance as relative, there are very large things all around us, but the distance keeps them small; things like the number of people on the planet, the size of a city, even the energy radiating from the Sun every year (3.8 million exajoules) can become trivial. 

On 7/9/2022 at 1:04 PM, WildWill said:

10,000 Hiroshima’s doesn’t really give me a good sense of the magnitudes. I believe Hiroshima was around 12-16,000 Tons TNT equivalent. 10,000 Hiroshima’s would be around 300 Megatons TNT equivalent. Enough to destroy the habitability of the earth for a few hundred thousand years…

There are larger perspectives where a few hundred thousand years is still small. 

On 7/9/2022 at 1:04 PM, WildWill said:

The Russians actually tested a 50 megaton Hydrogen bomb (underground) it’s believed they were off on the desired yield and the boom was actually around 70 Megatons. Not quite enough to destroy the planet, but would be really really bad if detonated on the surface. 

 

Still, when I try to truly comprehend that much power and energy, it’s hard (at least for my simple mind) to really get my head around the scale. 

If you where the size a small bacterium, or some blip on an atomic nucleus, a human body would be a nebula or galaxy to traverse. 

On 7/9/2022 at 1:04 PM, WildWill said:

10,000 Hiroshima’s. Can you really picture it in your mind?

Yes, but any imagination is an abstraction, it's unreal, a cartoon. 

 

I know this might be off topic, but it seemed worthwhile to reply. I have enjoyed the development of 3053, and hope there will be a bit more fireworks before it dissipates completely. 

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