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Coronal holes


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10 hours ago, Philalethes said:

Not the best time of year for auroral activity though, unless you live somewhere far south in the Southern Hemisphere.

how far south would this have to be?

im in Albany Western Australia which is the southernmost point of WA this weekend. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Prizma1227 said:

how far south would this have to be?

im in Albany Western Australia which is the southernmost point of WA this weekend. 

I doubt that's far enough south; problem with the Southern Hemisphere is how the landmass is distributed much closer to the equator overall, as you might know.

And we don't know yet if there will be any geomagnetic activity from it of course, but Earth-facing coronal holes frequently do lead to some some. Better if they're a bit bigger though.

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On 6/14/2024 at 5:19 PM, Philalethes said:

I doubt that's far enough south; problem with the Southern Hemisphere is how the landmass is distributed much closer to the equator overall, as you might know.

And we don't know yet if there will be any geomagnetic activity from it of course, but Earth-facing coronal holes frequently do lead to some some. Better if they're a bit bigger though.

i saw someone post some images of it over the weekend so the conditions were better than i expected.

i had all my camera gear ready to go but didnt think it was going to be nice enough to catch it.

ah well.

ya live and ya learn

Edited by Prizma1227
Carmera
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15 minutes ago, Prizma1227 said:

i saw someone post some images of it over the weekend so the conditions were better than i expected.

i had all my camera gear ready to go but didnt think it was going to be nice enough to catch it.

ah well.

ya live and ya learn

There's another larger coronal hole opening up and rotating in to earth view as we speak.

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On 6/13/2024 at 8:30 PM, Philalethes said:

Not sure how it'll develop over the next few days, but it looks to be at a very geoeffective latitude. 

 

Hi we have a moderately high speed solar wind since 24 hours. CH 45 ?

 

chart.thumb.jpg.dd42b1ed7a2f95bc859c0076549dec07.jpg

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22 hours ago, Jesterface23 said:

Yep, this would be the Coronal Hole High Speed Stream.

Since 48 hours solar wind ! 

Polar connected CH 46 Is now partially facing earth ! And we can see "the huge filament below and the new ar 3718 on the left. 

 ch46.jpg.3e29a8cb5f464960c3f46e632f46eaa7.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Since this CH Let the SWPC to make a G1 notice I have a question. What makes coronal holes "stronger" or "weaker" because they all seem to have different stream speeds and densities? 

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39 minutes ago, Adohran said:

Since this CH Let the SWPC to make a G1 notice I have a question. What makes coronal holes "stronger" or "weaker" because they all seem to have different stream speeds and densities? 

The polarity/magnetic orientation, speed, density, and temperature are definitely key factors.

Some other important aspects are:

If its a reoccurring or not. This can help determine the chances of CIR effects.

Position, size, and shape. When the leading edge is longitudinally straight, the winds can be very abrupt and will have a greater initial shock on our magnetosphere. When the CH is more round the winds tend to be more gradual.

Position and size are fairly obvious factors, if it's not pointed at us or very large, it probably won't have much influence. 

In this case, it's in fairly good position for geoeffectivness and last rotation I think there was some CIR's embedded in the solar wind.

Edited by Parabolic
Forgot some words
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1 hour ago, Parabolic said:

The polarity/magnetic orientation, speed, density, and temperature are definitely key factors.

Some other important aspects are:

If its a reoccurring or not. This can help determine the chances of CIR effects.

Position, size, and shape. When the leading edge is longitudinally straight, the winds can be very abrupt and will have a greater initial shock on our magnetosphere. When the CH is more round the winds tend to be more gradual.

Position and size are fairly obvious factors, if it's not pointed at us or very large, it probably won't have much influence. 

In this case, it's in fairly good position for geoeffectivness and last rotation I think there was some CIR's embedded in the solar wind.

I have another somewhat related question:   Does a geoeffective CH  also perhaps “ clear the way” resulting in higher solar wind speeds after it passes?  Tnx. Mike asking this due to the known results of CME passages. 

Edited by hamateur 1953
Clarity
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1 hour ago, hamateur 1953 said:

I have another somewhat related question:   Does a geoeffective CH  also perhaps “ clear the way” resulting in higher solar wind speeds after it passes?  Tnx. Mike asking this due to the known results of CME passages. 

Yep, it definitely can produce a clearer path for other solar winds. I think that interplay is responsible for creating most CIR/SIR's. The coriolis effect can create some interesting combination of interactions. I haven't learned a whole lot on the actual deflection rates yet but I have a theory in my head that CH's that stretch from equator to high latitudes have the highest probably of creating CIR/SIR features. I imagine that's how we go from nominal solar wind and get a random bump to Bt 15-20nt and fall back to ambient conditions a couple hours later.

Edited by Parabolic
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1 minute ago, BasedBenny said:

spacer.pngFunny moment from the coronal hole bot. Mistaking the Earth for a massive coronal hole. Could you imagine the solar particles?

Haha can't stop laughing now 🤣 

I just love how it says "is facing Earth" and it is actually the Earth

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10 minutes ago, Sagatha said:

Earth needs to move out of the way, it's blocking the TV

Yes, totally, I can't see what's on SBC (Space Broadcasting Cooperation)

4 minutes ago, TheRealGenesis said:

This large sized coronal hole is going to devour us all! Uaaaaaahhhhhh!!!

Save us all!

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9 hours ago, Zhe Yu said:

Does this happen on a regular basis? If so, then I'll just get used to it...

Hopefully that's not a real coronal hole!spacer.png

It's definitely not the Earth, strange shape for a planet!

I think the Earth transiting only happens for a few weeks at a time within a certain timeframe of SDO’s geosynchronous orbit.

 

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3 hours ago, BasedBenny said:

I think the Earth transiting only happens for a few weeks at a time within a certain timeframe of SDO’s geosynchronous orbit.

 

Ok, and someone told me that SDO is quite old now, does this effect the camera every now and often?

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