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Removal of the SWPC scaling factor for GOES data prior to GOES-16


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  • 1 month later...

Is this applied also to alerts about incoming radio blackout? We just got a R1 alert with a note about current value of M3.33, however the graph never got that exact value - after M2.54 there was a jump to M3.38. It's actually a close value, but not exact and made me think if the correction was actually applied there as well.

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16 minuten geleden, libmar96 zei:

Is this applied also to alerts about incoming radio blackout? We just got a R1 alert with a note about current value of M3.33, however the graph never got that exact value - after M2.54 there was a jump to M3.38. It's actually a close value, but not exact and made me think if the correction was actually applied there as well.

Current GOES satellites don’t have the correction factor. It only applies to the satellites prior to GOES-16. Currently GOES-18 is primary satellite.

keep in mind that our alerts get send by our server when data is pulled from the satellite feed, what you see on the site/app can be few minutes behind due to caching of data to be able to handle the loads of visitors that come after an alert. If we wouldn’t cache, we would go down after each alert which isn’t what we want 😉

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On 12/31/2023 at 6:51 PM, hamateur 1953 said:

Way cool. My favorite region 10486 is now officially an X-40 or a Y-4 if @Newbieweighs in too. Haha.  

Imagine if we ever got to see a Z-flare, heh. With the new GOES scaling, the Carrington flare is adjusted from the estimate of X45 to X64 in current terms, as mentioned here:

Quote

For example, the peak SXR classes for the 1 September 1859 (X45 ± 5) and 774 AD (~ X285 ± 140) events will increase to X64.4 ± 7.2 and ~ X410 ± 200, respectively, while that for the largest possible solar flare changes from X180 (− 100, + 300) to X260 (− 140, + 430).

And those other estimates are also quite wild, although naturally far more speculative; but I'd certainly love to see a Z-flare myself.

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