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Question Regarding GOES x-ray Flux


Go to solution Solved by Philalethes,

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Hello all, 

 

i somewhat understand the Goes Xray Flux charts, however.

i notice that before some flares there is period where Goes 16 short and goes 18 short diverge and show different levels, and ive noticed it happens shortly before some activity ( small or large) happens. 

for instance : 2024-06-10 at 02:26 UTC

Goes 16 Short -  2.82e-8

Goes 18 Short -  1.80e-8

( i have referenced the largest difference between the two satelites/sensors in the last 6 hours ) its not always this different. 

what does this difference in data show us? is it mainly a "failsafe" second point of data from Goes 16 ( with 18 being the most recent satellite) 

from my very meagre knowledge on orbital mechanics it seems like the satellites themselves are quote close to each other.

Am i interpreting the data incorrectly? 

 

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2 hours ago, Prizma1227 said:

Hello all, 

 

i somewhat understand the Goes Xray Flux charts, however.

i notice that before some flares there is period where Goes 16 short and goes 18 short diverge and show different levels, and ive noticed it happens shortly before some activity ( small or large) happens. 

for instance : 2024-06-10 at 02:26 UTC

Goes 16 Short -  2.82e-8

Goes 18 Short -  1.80e-8

( i have referenced the largest difference between the two satelites/sensors in the last 6 hours ) its not always this different. 

what does this difference in data show us? is it mainly a "failsafe" second point of data from Goes 16 ( with 18 being the most recent satellite) 

from my very meagre knowledge on orbital mechanics it seems like the satellites themselves are quote close to each other.

Am i interpreting the data incorrectly? 

I've noticed it myself, but I'm not sure what the reason is. Given the fact that it seems to always be GOES-18 that's a bit lower I'm guessing it doesn't really have anything to do with where they are in their orbits, and that it's primarily a calibration issue; but I'm not entire sure, maybe someone else knows some more details about it.

As for which satellite is considered to be the primary source of data, you're right that GOES-18 is newer, but sometimes GOES-16 is still used as the preferred source of data, not entirely sure why that is either, but could possibly also have to do with calibration or what's been found to be most accurate. You can see which of them is considered primary for the various data points here, and as you can see it's currently GOES-16 that's considered primary for everything except protons.

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If I remember correctly, GOES-16 and -18 handle electron and proton contamination differently, which plays a role on low flux. The effect was very obvious during solar minimum. But currently I can't find the details.

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