Jump to content

"It Was Fake, It Was HAARP" - What?


Recommended Posts

I am so confused and I hope someone has answers as I don't know where to begin with this.

Are these people who post things like this just uneducated in what the aurorae are, are they willingly ignorant about it or are they brainwashed by whatever thing caused them to think this way. 

How can the poster think HAARP is responsible for this? There is categorically no way the HAARP scientific experiments are even remotely linked to the solar storm or high auroral activity seen around Earth recently.

I've never seen anything like this concerning the aurora and was curious if anyone has any answers to why people think this way.

I've redacted the name for obvious reasons and apologise if it's super off topic I am just perplexed.

(Facebook group: Sacred Geometry)

Screenshot_20240517-230954 (1).png

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Long SWL reader but first time commenting, mainly because this pegs the absurdity needle. I vote brainwashed because there is also categorically no way the CIA could wipe out every bird on the planet without widespread awareness and immediate and dire environmental consequences, yet "birds aren't real". No amount of proof, scientific literature or common sense will prove otherwise. 

How can I be so sure? Simple: Elvis is a regular guest lecturer on these and other topics at a local Waffle House. But I've said too much...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've also seen multiple comments like this on Facebook, sometimes posted in groups unrelated to science. I don't really know but I feel like there are people who just refuse to learn and verify information, or it's the same thing as with flat earthers.. There's FAQ on HAARP's website that answers and corrects their "theories" if they even bother to read it. One thing I don't understand is these comments have a lot of likes and it gives me the impression that there are many more people who support this nonsense. The same thing happens in the comments section of climate change posts. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The HAARP conspiracy has been going around vor a very long time.
Debunking those is about as "easy" as debunking flat earthers.

But they do very interesting stuff at HAARP. And sometimes ask amateurs to observe their experiments. But of course their 3.6 MW transmit power doesn't do anything compared to the hunderts of GW injected by solar activity. There are also many commercial broadcast facilities which transmit with several MW and nobody complains about them.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think trying to understand how someone could come to conclusions like this is perhaps a bit futile. The phrase 'Don't try and understand crazy' comes to mind. People holding beliefs like this aren't coming from a rational place so no amount of rationale could debunk these beliefs. I've also noticed that it's usually a general pattern rather than about a single thing; people who hold one conspiracy theory flavoured belief usually hold a lot more.

But that leaves the question of why.

I see it as a form of transference. Perhaps they've grown up being gaslit, lied to or generally manipulated. Perhaps they're in, or have been in a relationship featuring the same. Or, perhaps it's just a cumulation of all the small lies we're told. "This yoghurt will cure all your gut problems while making you ludicrously happy", "This politician is going to fix all the stuffs", "Being rich is the path to happiness"... In the modern world and the exposure to media we have now, we're exposed more to these little lies than we've ever been. Or perhaps they've previously been sucked into some cult-like thing like scientology or MLM schemes.

But whatever the reason, lets say a lot of people have reason to feel lied to or to distrust what they're told by perceived authority. That could then become generalised into a pattern of reactively distrusting anything any perceived authority says. These kind of emotion-driven patterns often happen very subconsciously and too rapidly to offer a window for rational analysis.

I can seen then how this could express as a pattern of searching for and holding onto any explanation for things that doesn't match the party line. Perhaps it offers them a sense of safety to hold such beliefs. This would certainly explain how conspiracy theorists react when their beliefs are challenged; reactions often seem as if they feel in danger and are under personal attack.

If we take this general explanation, unravelling the conspiracy theories themselves would kind of be missing the point. Really what would be needed is therapy to find and work on the root causes of the paranoia behind the pattern.

Anyway, that's just a possible explanation for what it's worth.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/17/2024 at 11:39 PM, Sam Warfel said:

"not for the lazy ones" LMAO 

I know this really made me laugh. 

On 5/17/2024 at 11:47 PM, Misaka said:

Can HAARP please do Auroras more often? I want to have something like last week again. And while we're at it, I would like some nice weather too. And the moon would also be great if HAARP could make it invisible for a short time. 🤣

 

I know right? If we can book a date and time when the skies are clear and I've got the day off the next day so I can be up all night. That'd be great.

On 5/18/2024 at 11:49 AM, HalfFeralHuman said:

I think trying to understand how someone could come to conclusions like this is perhaps a bit futile. The phrase 'Don't try and understand crazy' comes to mind. People holding beliefs like this aren't coming from a rational place so no amount of rationale could debunk these beliefs. I've also noticed that it's usually a general pattern rather than about a single thing; people who hold one conspiracy theory flavoured belief usually hold a lot more.

But that leaves the question of why.

I see it as a form of transference. Perhaps they've grown up being gaslit, lied to or generally manipulated. Perhaps they're in, or have been in a relationship featuring the same. Or, perhaps it's just a cumulation of all the small lies we're told. "This yoghurt will cure all your gut problems while making you ludicrously happy", "This politician is going to fix all the stuffs", "Being rich is the path to happiness"... In the modern world and the exposure to media we have now, we're exposed more to these little lies than we've ever been. Or perhaps they've previously been sucked into some cult-like thing like scientology or MLM schemes.

But whatever the reason, lets say a lot of people have reason to feel lied to or to distrust what they're told by perceived authority. That could then become generalised into a pattern of reactively distrusting anything any perceived authority says. These kind of emotion-driven patterns often happen very subconsciously and too rapidly to offer a window for rational analysis.

I can seen then how this could express as a pattern of searching for and holding onto any explanation for things that doesn't match the party line. Perhaps it offers them a sense of safety to hold such beliefs. This would certainly explain how conspiracy theorists react when their beliefs are challenged; reactions often seem as if they feel in danger and are under personal attack.

If we take this general explanation, unravelling the conspiracy theories themselves would kind of be missing the point. Really what would be needed is therapy to find and work on the root causes of the paranoia behind the pattern.

Anyway, that's just a possible explanation for what it's worth.

This is a fantastic answer and I really appreciate all the avenues that went into a possible conspiracy theorist. I am seeing more and more people even on my local pages talking about HAARP now who previously wouldn't have and likely had never heard of HAARP before this last aurora so it's quite a bit of a trendy new conspiracy theory it seems. 

Thanks again for giving all the possible reasons someone could end up like this, I hadn't ever considered that all these things in someone's life could one day play a role in something like some wild views on space weather

On 5/18/2024 at 1:24 AM, MZPL said:

I've also seen multiple comments like this on Facebook, sometimes posted in groups unrelated to science. I don't really know but I feel like there are people who just refuse to learn and verify information, or it's the same thing as with flat earthers.. There's FAQ on HAARP's website that answers and corrects their "theories" if they even bother to read it. One thing I don't understand is these comments have a lot of likes and it gives me the impression that there are many more people who support this nonsense. The same thing happens in the comments section of climate change posts. 

Maybe I'll keep linking their FAQ every time I come across a HAARPist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/17/2024 at 3:23 PM, ElementalAnarchy said:

Are these people who post things like this just uneducated in what the aurorae are, are they willingly ignorant about it or are they brainwashed by whatever thing caused them to think this way. 

As this is the premise, I wanted to chime in about the brainwashing.

In an echo chamber, a doctrine or narrative stands as the primary talking point. It is not only the focus and mission to repeat one another's memes(in a classical sense, not merely "funny pictures" but ideological signaling), but to voraciously attack all critics and deeper-thinking directed towards these memes or the echo chamber itself. A mob must be convinced through a reward scheme offered on the other side of their ideological standpoints, which vary to many degrees within individual members.

I generally offer the reward of discovery, curiosity, and critical knowledge one can attain by merely opening their concurrent views to the possibility of being misguided or misinformed. It is not something I possess and can give, but that all may relinquish and pursue. Brainwashing is simply parasitism by way of cementing memes and exploiting their impact on the human psyche. The cure is instilling the understanding that we have so much to learn, and can learn, but self-obstruct by force of habit, or by the walls of the echo chamber one is in.

tl;dr There is no science involved in an argument which weaponizes a critical misunderstanding of available information. Welcome to a more free-thinking community :D 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you also agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy.