Jump to content

AR 13229, X2.28 flare!


MinYoongi
Go to solution Solved by arjemma,

Recommended Posts

7 minutes ago, MinYoongi said:

What do you mean by extremely eruptive? 

i read we're likely only getting a shock passage, what do you think?

Looking at SDO's AIA 211 imagery, the shock going across the Sun is impressive.

If the incoming CH can stay below velocities of 500km/s, I think there is a good chance Earth will get an impact based on how close STEREO A is and its view so far.

.....

And just noticed new C3 imagery from SOHO came in and looks good.

Edited by Jesterface23
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dont know what to make of "looks good".

because some people like HaloCME and others say it will either not arrive at all or only a shock. i link you the sources.

looking at the first video, the wave didnt went all the way over the central meridan right?

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, MinYoongi said:

I dont know what to make of "looks good".

because some people like HaloCME and others say it will either not arrive at all or only a shock. i link you the sources.

looking at the first video, the wave didnt went all the way over the central meridan right?

 

 

The looks good is we see that CME is coming at us from SOHO's LASCO C3 imagery.

That tweet video is awesome. There is one important note when looking at the wave going across the disk. There is a central disk and southeastern CH blocking the wave from crossing, though I can't say how much further it would have gone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You’re in good company. As usual I was on Solar Ham and the main board here hadn’t even refreshed for me. I was adding this monster. outta likes or would laugh with ya!  

Indeed!!  550 sfu is also pretty impressive…. I wonder where the gamma region begins.  Hopefully someone with more experience in this area will comment. I have seen 380 before but never something like this. 

  • Cool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am quite surprised about the earth directed halo part after so many CMEs went all around but
earth directed.
Little pity I am already back from Tromsø in mid January but from 7 days we got 6 with northern
lights anyway. Did you see the show they had few days ago on February 15th?:

Fireshow in green and red

Down here in Switzerland we (radioamateurs) still waiting for radio contacts via the reflection zone
of radio aurora since many years...so I am wonder what the magnetic field is doing if this nice partly
halo is arriving.

Regards, Chris

 

 

 

4 minutes ago, MinYoongi said:

Someone on twitter said "luckily it wasnt directed at us" i dont really like this talk because it befires sensationalism. Coming from a spaceweather account it makes me even sadder 😕 

Me2, Min

I remember many earth directed Xs last cycles and guess what? - we are still alive! Also the satellites.
But you know, Dr. Phillips seems to need klicks for his hundreds of ads on the page, so "sensations"
are always garanteed. 😁

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Twenty two minutes in duration.  Wow Min that’s gotta be pretty long, I recall waiting for it to hit background…. fascinating!!  Our “ D” layer ( ionosphere)was ionized for three hours. 

Thanks for posting those beautiful pix Chris!!  Awesome. Again, I remain envious… such is our lower latitude experience!  🤣73. Mike. 

Note: I suffer from PLE:  Persistent 

Latitude Envy. 

Edited by hamateur 1953
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh that’s all so exciting. I’m usally just reading your comments because I‘m mainly a photographer and just a part time space weather nerd (and honestly just in the winter months when I’m on iceland or in Norway for a phototrip) but as I‘m on Iceland now for a week this could be interesting. Thanks for all your explanations - love to learn more here!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, hamateur 1953 said:

Twenty two minutes in duration.  Wow Min that’s gotta be pretty long, I recall waiting for it to hit background…. fascinating!!  Our “ D” layer ( ionosphere)was ionized for three hours. 

Thanks for posting those beautiful pix Chris!!  Awesome. Again, I remain envious… such is our lower latitude experience!  🤣73. Mike. 

Note: I suffer from PLE:  Persistent 

Latitude Envy. 

PLE 🤣

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, MinYoongi said:

Por cierto, ¿ha cambiado la Región desde la llamarada? No miré SDO a fondo antes y las películas siempre son un poco pequeñas.

 

The region did not change anything, it must have given off its flare, if I saw  Magnetogram image, it seemed strange to me to see a solar flare x in that region and I could be almost sure that there was not a delta or anything visible to me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember lookin at the incoming “. green screen” the day before as I am sure others do on a regular basis and thinking that “ it’s probably nothing but certainly is pretty doggone white”.    Sun really had to puke, I guess!  

1 hour ago, Isatsuki San said:

The region did not change anything, it must have given off its flare, if I saw  Magnetogram image, it seemed strange to me to see a solar flare x in that region and I could be almost sure that there was not a delta or anything visible to me

Edited by hamateur 1953
omitted word. ( senior moment)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really?? I would expect X radiation to travel at light speed or close to it. Particle events ( proton) take longer of course.  Or were you inferring something else perhaps? 

18 hours ago, mozy said:

After effects of a long duration flare with a cme associated tends to do that.

 

Edited by hamateur 1953
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you also agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy.